arduino

Within the players below you'll see and hear several videos related to "Tones of Discouse: The Arduino Project." My colleague, Kevin Brock, and I worked on a project that highlights the translation of text to tones using the processing power of the Arduino Mega along with scholarly citations and textual inputs of theorist discourse. By translating the texts into a 7-octave scale of tonal values, we seek to recognize the similarities and differences within conventional language structures when displayed in new forms. We'd like to thank Dan Anderson for allowing us to use a recent Kairos submission in order to highlight the tonal similarities between three different citation styles. To read more about this project, read the texual accompaniment below the video examples. This project was presented at Computers & Writing 2011 in Ann Arbor, MI.

Anderson to APA

This video demonstrates the aural equivalent of the APA citation style for Anderson, D. A. (2010). I'm a Map; I'm a Green Tree. Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, 15.1. Retrieved from http://www.technorhetoric.net/15.1/topoi/anderson/index.html

Anderson to MLA

This video demonstrates the aural equivalent of the MLA citation style for Anderson, Daniel. "I'm a Map; I'm a Green Tree." Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 15.1 (2010): n. pag. Web 6 December 2010.

Anderson to Chicago

This video demonstrates the aural equivalent of the Chicago citation style for Anderson, Daniel. "I'm a map; I'm a green tree." Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 15.1 (2010): n. pag. Accessed December 6, 2010. http://www.technorhetoric.net/15.1/topoi/anderson/index.html

Random Tone Generator

Following the Oulipo, we consider the constraints of a 7-octave scale to bring about new forms of invention and expression. To demonstrate this, a random tone generator was included within the project to highlight how the use of citation styles and specific patterns enables recognizable connections while the use of a random generator produced no discernible connection to textual tones.

Citation to Tone: Tone Delay Patterns

This video demonstrates the change in musical citation style when the tone delay is altered. 

Description of "Theory to Tone: The Arduino Microprocessor as Translator of Discourse"

Our project consists of a collection of experiments with the Arduino microprocessor that serve to demonstrate the translational powers of computer programming, sound, and electricity. Specifically, we have sought to explore how Arduino can interpret textual input (for our project, we used excerpts of academics' citations and critical texts) into forms of sound that are explicitly unrelated to conventional human language.